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Cornflower book group

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  • Sidebar book cover thumbnail pictures are affiliate links to Amazon, and the storefront links to Blackwell's and The Book Depository are also affiliated; should you purchase a book directly through those links, I will receive a small commission. Older posts may also contain affiliate links to one of those bookshops. I am not paid to produce content and all opinions are my own.

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Desperate Reader

Scones must be in the air, I wrote about them last week. Now my question is - How do you make yours Cornflower?

Cornflower

With a different recipe every time! I'm still searching for the perfect one, but have had very good results with my mother's recipe, and my mother-in-law's (which uses buttermilk), and Nigella's (Domestic Goddess). I'd like to try a comparative tasting, though, pitting Mr. Hollywood against Mrs. Macnab!

adele geras

I am still trying all kinds of recipes! Waterstone's In Canterbury sent me a super cheese scone recipe and Mary Berry's is very good, too. I went to Ickworth House on Friday and they have skyscraper scones. HIGH HIGH HIGH. But not as light as some lower ones...it's a delicate balanace.

Cornflower

It would be fun - if time-consuming - to do as scientifically rigorous a test as could be managed in a domestic kitchen, trying out all manner of recipes. I suspect there'd be no shortage of volunteers for the tasting!

Barbara MacLeod

Well, well! The recipe I use for my scones is exactly the same an Mrs Macnab! I have used it for years and think it was from the SWRI (Scottish Women's Rural Institutes) book.

As it happened I made a batch this morning for workmen!

Cornflower

Better watch, Barbara, or the King of Prussia will be popping in any minute!

Rebecca

I am certainly a fan of adding buttermilk and egg (on the advice of my Aunt Isabel who several years ago gave me the best scones I had ever tasted) In fact, I made some this way yesterday.

Erika

I made little leaden scones for years, although they tasted alright, until my Texan husband said "buttermilk"--using his Danish Maw-Maw's recipe produces dreams of lightness and fluffiness.

adele geras

Okay! Buttermilk it is! I've copied this McNab recipe and will try it very soon!

Dark Puss

I note (from OED) the next entry after the one you quote is from the Complaynt of Scotland (c1550):

"Thai hed na breyd botry caikis and fustean skonnis maid of flour."

At that date fustean appears to be exclusively a type of coarse cloth (cotton & flax); any idea why it's being used here?

Barbara MacLeod

I had a quick look on the internet. It is to do with their coarse texture and perhaps their colour.

Also the phrase fustian skonnis is still in current use in Angus.

Dark Puss

Barbara, thank you!

alison morris

I use a slight adaptation of Clare MacDonald's recipe - She uses a tablespoon of vegetable oil (to 12 0z flour and 1/2 pint milk) instead of rubbing fat into the flour. I replace the milk with buttermilk if I can get it and milk mixed with live yoghurt if I can't.

adele geras

I had a brilliant scone experience at the weekend. Went to the White Lion Hotel in Aldeburgh and was so impressed with the scones which were the lightest I've ever eaten, that I wrote to the chef and asked for the recipe! He very kindly shared it with me and when I've road tested it, I'll tell you all about it here. Main difference with his seems to be: MUCH cooler oven and WAITING fifteen minutes between dough being ready and baking it. Will report back. Still haven't made the McNab scones...

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Please note

  • Sidebar book cover thumbnail pictures are affiliate links to Amazon, and the storefront links to Blackwell's and The Book Depository are also affiliated; should you purchase a book directly through those links, I will receive a small commission. Older posts may also contain affiliate links to one of those bookshops. I am not paid to produce content and all opinions are my own.

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