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Cornflower book group

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  • Sidebar book cover thumbnail pictures are affiliate links to Amazon, and the storefront links to Blackwell's and The Book Depository are also affiliated; should you purchase a book directly through those links, I will receive a small commission. Older posts may also contain affiliate links to one of those bookshops. I am not paid to produce content and all opinions are my own.

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Jennifer

I don't know how they did it, absolutely heartbreaking.

m

Somehow fabric tokens seem even more poignant than metal ones, don't they? Maybe because they're less durable, they make you think how little chance there was for these mothers of ever reclaiming their children.

Elizabeth

That is so sad - the handwork, embroidery and stitching makes it even sadder. Poor little things, mothers and babies. As Jennifer said, "absolutely heartbreaking".

Fran H-B

Last year I visited the Foundling Museum to view this exhibition. The room full of these hearbreaking scraps is only a small proportion of the whole collection. When one realises the vast numbers of desperate mother's who resorted to giving their children up, it is harrowing. An exhibition which will stay with me for a long time.

Karen

I remember seeing an article about these scraps, and the exhibition, in the December issue of Crafts magazine - heartbreaking it is. I can't even begin to think about how those mothers must have felt.

Merilyn

So sad its hard to even imagine how those mothers felt.Have you read Selvedge Magazine issue 36. They have a very good article about the Foundling Hospital.

Erika

I am reading Gillian Pugh's "London's Lost Children", a history of the Foundling Hospital, at this very time. It is stodgily written but full of the answers to one's possible questions.

Passionate Blogger

'The pieces of fabric in the ledgers were kept, with the expectation that they could be used to identify the child if it was returned to its mother.' So heartwrenching.... filled with hope.

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Please note

  • Sidebar book cover thumbnail pictures are affiliate links to Amazon, and the storefront links to Blackwell's and The Book Depository are also affiliated; should you purchase a book directly through those links, I will receive a small commission. Older posts may also contain affiliate links to one of those bookshops. I am not paid to produce content and all opinions are my own.

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