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Lindsay

Mulberries were so common in some areas where I last lived, that they often lay on the ground uncollected - though I imagine they were soon hoovered up by pigs and goats. But not in Edinburgh, apparently - not even in the Botanic Gardens?

Dark Puss

The limit of Mulberry cultivation (I mean successful cultivation) is roughly similar to wheat (at least its pre 20th C cultivars). I cannot remember offhand whether Edinburgh Botanical Gardens has a Black Mulberry growing in it. However a collection search reveals that both Morus alba and Morus niger are represented in the living collection at the Botanics.

Ah here is an (unverified) quote from this source http://www.grangeassociation.org/product/100.pdf

"Anyone doubting the willingness of Black mulberry to grow in Scotland, should visit the vigorous tree at Luffness or, for that matter, the tree near the bird cage in the Cooper Park, Elgin. I know of three planted in Edinburgh in recent years which, after a slow start, are beginning to motor. Fruit should not be expected for twenty years but then is likely to be copious and delicious, as is the case with the mulberry planted by the Queen Mother in the garden of Haddington House."

There is a large, and well fruiting, Mulberry in Keats Grove, London which we enquired about many years ago. We were told that there was a queue to collect the fruit and that the waiting list was about 20 years. Currently the waiting list for an allotment in our part of London exceedes 40 years, so perhaps we should have put our names down!

Teresa

I have a mulberry tree which has decided to grow up from two stems into a most beautiful tree. It unfurls its leaves last waiting like some precious princess for it to be warm enough but it is so elegant. The trouble is that it takes many years to fruit (although ours astounded us by fruiting after three years) which is why, I think, people don't plant them and then you have to get to the fruits before the birds.
I have a wedding photo taken by the mulberry tree in my parents house and remember my mother baking mulberry and apple puddings.
I would say that a mixture of blackberries and raspberries might give you something like the sweet and sour taste of the mulberry.

Tram-Anh

My friend Alice made this for us last night and it's delicious! The best bakewell tart I've ever had! She used raspberries, which I think worked perfectly.

Cornflower

It is a good recipe, Tram-Anh - definitely one to make again (and as a very kind friend has just sent me some Mulberry Preserve, I shall try it with that next time, but raspberries would be delicious).

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Please note

  • Sidebar book cover thumbnail pictures are affiliate links to Amazon, and the storefront links to Blackwell's and The Book Depository are also affiliated; should you purchase a book directly through those links, I will receive a small commission. Older posts may also contain affiliate links to one of those bookshops. I am not paid to produce content and all opinions are my own.

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