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  • Sidebar book cover thumbnail pictures are affiliate links to Amazon, and the storefront links to Blackwell's and The Book Depository are also affiliated; should you purchase a book directly through those links, I will receive a small commission. Older posts may also contain affiliate links to one of those bookshops. I am not paid to produce content and all opinions are my own.

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Rebecca

The discussion on "finding time" is an interesting one. As one of those "stay at home mothers" it seems that my suplus of time is often the envy of acquaintances (many of whom are childless). I frequently here the unfit one say, "well I'd love to walk/practise yoga like you do but I just don't have time". In fact I get up early to practise yoga and run or walk because I am actually quite busy during the hours the children are at school. "Well, I'd love to knit or craft, but I don't have time", hmmm, why not do it in the evenings while watching television, that's what I do!

You make the point that you must arrange your time in order to meet your deadlines and I think that is the crucial point, we all feel short of time but if we really want to do something we can undoubtedly make the time. Right now, I am on my lunchbreak and taking the time to read through my favourite blogs while eating my sandwich, occasionally moving to the stove to stir the simmering chutney and waiting for the bathroom cleaning spray to take effect.

Now, I do have a question for you Karen, have managed to master the art of reading whilst knitting? I eyed up one of those hands free gadgets in Waterstones today and wondered about the possibility. That would surely be a wonderful sort of multi-tasking!

Peter the Flautist

I just don't agree that "one can make time" is anything other than a euphamism for "give up something else and use that released time". Of course with good planning and the reduction of interruptions there is an efficiency increase, and I suppose that it is possible to read a book deeply while doing something else (I can't). To comment on Cornflower's envy of those of us who regularly travel on trains, well yes I do read quite a lot (work related) BUT I also think a lot too, and on long (non-tube) journeys I work pretty much all the time I am in transit. To read more non-work books means giving up time that might have been allocated to work. I'm not sure I'm persuading anyone here ...

Dark Puss

Lisa

I too read at a moderate pace. I find that I've increased my reading pace over the years somewhat. I find that I make the time for the things that I want to do. However, there is never enough time to do all that I want to. But, rarely does a day go by that I don't read and knit.

adele geras

I've just put up a comment on Elaine's post. It's very interesting this question of how people read, isn't it? And I am going to move on to Behaviour of Moths any day now...just a couple of proofs to read before that, for friends of mine who have sent them to me. Then it's MOTHS all round.

Erika

Finding enough time to read has been a problem for me since I had children! Or rather, once I had my second child--babies nap so often and drink bottles so often that I took that time to read and refuel for the child-minding--because once they are toddling about you do have to keep an eye on them almost constantly. Now I have three children under 3 1/2, and evenings seem to be subsumed with cleaning up and exercising to lose the last few pounds of pregnancy weight, and my only reading time seems to be in bed when I am already half-asleep. But my to-be-read pile gives me great pleasure just thinking about all that I have to anticipate once my children become readers too and thus free up my time as well!

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Please note

  • Sidebar book cover thumbnail pictures are affiliate links to Amazon, and the storefront links to Blackwell's and The Book Depository are also affiliated; should you purchase a book directly through those links, I will receive a small commission. Older posts may also contain affiliate links to one of those bookshops. I am not paid to produce content and all opinions are my own.

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